What we Saw

 

 

As displayed in the graph of apparent disturbances, the 80-200kpc region exhibited the greatest portion of objects in all four disturbance categories, the ongoing merger count in the region being 99, recent merger count, 90, undisturbed count, 401, and unresolved count, 145.

 

  The graph of apparent morphologies shows that 80-200kpc region featured the highest amount of objects in the bulged, disk, and unresolved categories compared to all other regions. The apparent morphologies graph follows the same trend as the apparent disturbances graph; that is, the objects in the 80-200kpc range had the largest count.

 

  The graph of apparent morphologies shows that 80-200kpc region featured the highest amount of objects in the bulged, disk, and unresolved categories compared to all other regions. The apparent morphologies graph follows the same trend as the apparent disturbances graph; that is, the object count decreases as the regions become smaller and closer to the central quasar.

 

Potential Theories

The brightness of the quasar outshines numerous nearby objects, making them blend in as one object

The powerful supermassive black holes fueling the quasar are massive enough to cause nearby galaxies to merge with it.

 

Given that this study did not involve a hypothesis, this data and its trends can be used to create theories about quasars and their local environments. The intent of the study is not to prove or disprove existing theories, but rather to identify new patterns and inspire new ones. Clearly, the sample size was insufficient to establish a convincing pattern.

t count decreases as the regions become smaller and closer to the central quasar.

Frontiers of Science institute 2019 

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